How to transport carbon fiber mountain bike

Carbon fiber is increasingly used to build mountain bikes. Typically these high end bikes are not meant for rough transport, as the cost of repair can be quite high. The following pages will cover some tips on how to transport a carbon fiber mountain bike.

Fortunately, all of our carbon fiber bikes, as well as electric bikes, are stocked in the United States. You can pick up at the pick-up point. It can also be shipped to your designated location via our verified and secure courier.

Some bike bags are big enough that you leave the wheels on the bike, so it's probably better to follow the instructions for a hard case.

The number of companies making bicycle bags has grown exponentially to keep pace with the demand created by those who travel with their bikes. As a result, there are several different types of bags to choose from. The most common options are soft and hard cases, although there are also backpacks and cardboard boxes you can use.

The decision on which one best meets your needs depends on how often you'll be using it, how much money you want to spend and what type of bike you have.

For example, if you're only traveling once or twice a year, then spending a lot of money on a hard case might not make sense. However, if you travel frequently with your bike or plan to travel internationally, the protection offered by a hard case might be worth the investment.

Some bike bags are big enough that you leave the wheels on the bike, so it's probably better to follow the instructions for a hard case.

The wheels can quickly get damaged in transit if they're not protected.

The wheels can quickly get damaged in transit if they're not protected. If shipping the bike fully assembled, you'll need to pad the frame to ensure that the wheels don't smash into it and get dented or bent. This is especially true when shipping a bike with disc brakes, which are more prone to damage than conventional rim brakes.

If you're shipping a road bike with drop handlebars, make sure they're turned parallel to the bike's frame.

Never transport carbon-fiber bikes in soft cases.

You're going to be driving your bike home from a race somewhere. How are you going to get it there? In a car? Great, but what about a plane? You'll need to put it in a case, but don't just throw it on an old cardboard box or in the back of someone's van.

The best way to transport carbon-fiber bikes is in hard cases like this one. Never transport carbon-fiber bikes in soft cases.

You have three options: cardboard, soft sided and hard sided. Don't use cardboard unless there's absolutely no other option. It doesn't offer much protection and offers zero protection from the elements. If you absolutely must use cardboard, try to find one as big as possible and pad the frame with blankets or towels to protect it.

Make sure you never transport carbon-fiber bikes in soft cases, which might seem like a good idea because they're cheaper than hard cases and purportedly lighter, too. But soft cases aren't designed for the kind of abuse that they'll take during transport; they're more like covers than anything else and were designed for people who live a block away from their local coffee shop and are riding in fair weather only.

Preparing your bike for transportation requires removing pedals, handlebars, and seat posts.

Preparing your bike for transportation requires removing pedals, handlebars, and seat posts. Rear derailleur and front derailleur (if present) should be removed and wrapped in bubble wrap prior to packing in a box or case.

If you have a spare rear derailleur hanger, wrap it in bubble wrap and pack with the rear derailleur.

Front wheels should be removed from the bike and wrapped in bubble wrap. The rear wheel can be left on the bike if it is secured to the frame.

Bike cases are heavy, so make sure they are properly balanced when lifted. Keep the weight of the case evenly distributed and use two hands whenever possible.

Replace all hardware removed from the bike during preparation (e.g., pedals, seat post, handlebars) after arriving at your destination.

Carbon-fiber frames are stiff and tend to transmit more road vibration than aluminum, so opt for a well-padded setup.

Carbon-fiber frames are stiff and tend to transmit more road vibration than aluminum, so opt for a well-padded setup.

The most important component of any bike is the frame. It's the foundation that sets the geometry and handling course for a particular model. Carbon fiber is the latest buzzword in cycling, but aluminum still dominates because it provides a great ride at a lower cost. The other major bicycle frame material, steel, offers the best ride quality of any material, but in its traditional form it has fallen out of favor with racers due to its higher weight. However, there are several grades of steel tubing in use today and new welding techniques are making this classic frame material competitive again.

Aluminum frames are made by joining tubes in a variety of shapes: round, rectangular or triangular. It can be manipulated into almost any shape desired; however, the more it's manipulated from its original form (straight tube), the weaker it becomes. Aluminum is also prone to fatigue failure over time and as a result, manufacturers put stress limits on how much weight (rider plus gear) their frames can safely carry over how long a distance. This varies from company to company, but 300 pounds is common for road bikes and 200 pounds for mountain bikes.

Many riders prefer to remove their wheels completely.

In order to remove your wheels, you will need a tire lever. If you have a touring or commuting bike, or a mountain bike with just front suspension, then you can leave the rear wheel in place. Many riders prefer to remove their wheels completely. This is because it makes fixing a puncture much easier. It also makes it possible to clean the area around the brakes and hub without having to work around the wheel.

If you do remove your wheel, make sure that you store it in a safe place away from dirt, water and anything else that could damage it.

The first stage in removing your tire is to release the rim brake so there is no tension on the cable. You can do this by opening the quick release lever (if your bike has one) or by undoing the bolt at the top of the brake caliper and sliding out the cable.

Hold your bicycle by its saddle and turn it upside down so that it rests on its handlebars and seat. Stand with your knees bent slightly so that you don't put any strain on your back as you work on your wheel.